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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 22, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11.00: britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money — the head of the british army warns in a rare public intervention. three of ukip's mps resign in three of ukip‘s mps resign in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. an economic boost over brexit — the government's former treasury minister, himself a remainer, says earlier pessimistic predictions may not be as feared due to global economic growth. if this turns out to be borne out with more and more data in the coming months, the brexiteers will be like the cat with the cream, they'll be like there you go, i told you so, which of course is ridiculous. in the us, much of the federal government remains in shut down, after the senate postponed a crucial budget vote. a warning that too many young women are not getting screened for cervical cancer due to fears over
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body image. also this hour — another royal wedding in windsor. buckingham palace announces the engagement of princess eugenie to jack brooksbank — they'll get married this autumn. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. in a rare public intervention, the head of the army will warn today that britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies unless it gets extra money. in a speech to the defence think tank, the royal united services institute, general sir nick carter will point to russia's growing battlefield capabilities, including the threat posed by its long—range missiles and cyber warfare skills.
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simon clemison reports. images showing what russia said was a strike on syria. but the rockets come not from the mediterranean sea, but the caspian sea, more than 900 miles away. the head of the army says russia is building an increasingly aggressive military, which the uk is struggling to match. russia has also been simulating attacks closer to home, conducting large—scale exercises. this, the heavily armed klinongrad bordering lithuania. general sir nick carter will warn britain must take notice of what is going on around us and keep up, or we could be massively constrained. he will say the threats are not thousands of miles away, but are now on our doorstep. he says cyber warfare can also disrupt the lives of normal people. one of the most important aspects is to deter any aggression. you can only do that with a forward army and forward presence. we need a significant size in terms of the army. any thought of reducing
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the army below the numbers we have at the moment, about 80,000, i think it would put security at risk. the head of the army is not saying this in so many words, but one way to avoid the possibility of britain falling behind in combat could be money from the chancellor here at numberii. he certainly won't want to see any cuts. the speech will be made with the approval of the defence secretary, who has already said a 2% rise should be a base, not a ceiling. no word yet from the chancellor. simon cleminson, bbc news. let's speak now to labour's shadow defence secretary, nia griffith. she's in our westminster studio. good morning. what is labour's assessment of the capabilities of britain's military, both now and in the near future regarding britain's military, both now and in
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the nearfuture regarding other countries, particularly russia? we are concerned, countries, particularly russia? we are concerned , we countries, particularly russia? we are concerned, we have seen escalating threats of many different types whether it is cyber, hybrid wa rfa re types whether it is cyber, hybrid warfare of types whether it is cyber, hybrid wa rfa re of fa ke types whether it is cyber, hybrid warfare of fake news or some of the military manoeuvres we have seen russia participating in. what worries me is since they have been in government, the conservatives have cut the armed forces, reduce the army from over 100,000 down to 70 8000. it is a quarter of the army gone. there are real concerns. when you have the head of the army voicing these concerns it is time for the government to take them seriously. do you think it is wise for general sir nick carter to be so blunt about these potential vulnerabilities? i think he is using this as a last resort, i am sure he has tried very hard to make the arguments inside. but it has got to bea arguments inside. but it has got to be a public debate and i think the public do want to be kept secure. they know you cannot do security on
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the cheap and just as they want a decent social care service, they also want to be kept safe. you said in the commons recently, when the government is looking at defence spending mustn't become a contest between cyber security and more conventional military elements, do you feel that is going on in the government in terms of defence budgets? they are trying to have a review which is cost neutral. if you are having a review of the threats you must be prepared to put in the capabilities to deal with those threats. we had a record in government consistently more than the conservative spending and they need to look again at the way they are calculating the 2% of gdp spend which is our commitment to nato. what about trident, would labour get rid of that? we have been clear, we would keep trident. it is
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a small fraction of the overall defence budget. i want to ask you about gavin williamson, who we are told is publicly backing this speech today by general sir nick carter. do you feel there is a secretary of state to press as hard as he can to get more money for his department?” hope so, we do have chaos in the cabinet at the moment and there doesn't seem to be any proper communication and anyway he can deal with the chancellor and the prime minister, except in this public forum. i don't think it is good the government but i am worried about the security of this country and if it does make the chancellor wake up, then we have to say, go ahead and make the fuss. thank you very much for your time. ukip's deputy leader has resigned in protest over henry bolton's decision to step down as party leader. mep margot parker, who'll remain with the party, says mr bolton has left the party
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in "limbo" after refusing to go, despite receiving a vote of no confidence from ukip's national executive committee. mr bolton faces repeated calls to quit over offensive text messages sent by his former girlfriend. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. three resignations and it is starting to feel like a strategy? good morning. let's be very candid, this involves people you have never heard of resigning from positions you didn't know they held. but what is striking is the numbers and how frequently it is happening. we have had a row about the ukip leader and his now former girlfriend and those text messages. and senior figures his now former girlfriend and those text messages. and seniorfigures in
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the party last week saying he should walk the plank. in a meeting of the executive committee, where everybody on it except for the leader himself, said his time was. since then, resignations. margot parker, mep for the east midlands saying she will walk the plank and encourage mr bolton to do the same. then the immigration and integration spokesman doing the same this morning. he told me he had made his decision a week ago in the light of those messages, but waited until after the meeting yesterday before publicly announcing his decision. and the mep for the south—west of england, heading out to brussels today for meetings there. he is standing down as the trade and industry spokesperson, saying he couldn't serve any longer under the current leader. as things stand, henry bolton, absolutely of the view, he is going nowhere. so unless he walks the though will be this
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extraordinary meeting taking place in probably four weeks' time, where members will get a vote, providing more than 250 ukip members turn up, the vote will be binding. you'll have to turn up or go, depending on the outcome of the ballot. a quick word from nigel farage, who has denied he is thinking of starting up another party. listening to interviews with various ukip members today, they will welcome him back into the fold? he was a huge success and a brand above ukip, if you like, as theirfigurehead. someone, despite previous bouts of internal turbulence, could pursue their policies around brexit and the regs of it. without nigel farage, they have to find a space in the political debate that is
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distinctive. they want their overriding ambition of the referendum and securing brexit. what they want to see is a proper and true brexit rather than the compromises they expect theresa may will sign up to. the challenge for them is the electoral evidence so far suggests plenty of voters who used to back them, now effectively think theirjob is done. the membership has fallen under vote collapsed when you compare how they did in the general election last year from the one did in the general election last yearfrom the one in did in the general election last year from the one in 2015. chris mason, thank you very much. some breaking news coming from lincoln crown court where the manufacture of raf rejections it has pleaded guilty to health and safety offences following the death of the red arrows pilot, flight lieutenant sean cunningham. he died in 2011 when he was rejected from his aeroplane while it was on the ground at raf scampton. the company making the
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ejector seats has pleaded guilty to health and safety offences and a director of the company, john martyn, admitted those charges on behalf of the company. that coming from danny savage in the last few moments. let's cross to downing street where the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, is due to arrive. he is having discussions with borisjohnson, who is due to meet his us counterpart. they will be talking about syria, iran and yemen. we were talking in the last week or so about rex tillerson coming over, potentially to open the new us embassy of the donald trump said he wouldn't do it. of course, rex tillerson visiting the uk well
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be us government shutdown is under way back home. here is our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. donald trump may not be coming to britain, but his secretary of state is. rex tillerson arrived in london last night for a fresh round of diplomacy in european capitals. the foreign policy chief of america is expected to go to the new us embassy in london, the one donald trump said he does not like, and try to smooth ruffled feathers with assurances of the importance of the uk—us relationship. in his meetings with borisjohnson and senior security officials, rex tillerson is also going to seek common ground on key international issues. 0n syria, they will discuss not only the new turkish assault on kurdish forces in the north, but also upcoming meetings in geneva and elsewhere, to seek, yet again, some kind of political solution to the conflict. we arejust coming we are just coming away from that report because there is rex
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tillerson arriving at number ten to meet theresa may and primarily for those talks with his counterpart, borisjohnson on those talks with his counterpart, boris johnson on syria, those talks with his counterpart, borisjohnson on syria, yemen and other. we were talking about his visit not very long ago, because we heard of course that donald trump wasn't going to come to the uk to open the new us embassy. we heard that rex tillerson would carry out that rex tillerson would carry out that function instead one donald trump said he wouldn't. but there is a bit of ambiguity about whether that will happen. whether rex tillerson will open the embassy. more on that coming up very soon. let's return to the ukip story. you will be aware of three front bench resignations from ukip. margot parker, william dartmouth and also
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john bickley this morning all resigning in protest at the party leader, henry bolton's decision to continue as leader. let's speak now to ukip's chairman, paul 0akden. he's in our birmingham studio. is it counter—productive for ukip, these resignations? people have to do what they feel is most appropriate for them in the positions they have. if the individuals you have just mentioned think it best serves the party for them to stand to one side and let them to stand to one side and let the membership have their say on henry bolton's leadership, they will do so. it is not a strategy? no, it resonates with a lot of people and everybody has a strength of feeling on it but it is up to individuals to determine the right course of action for them. i determine the right course of action forthem. iam determine the right course of action for them. iam hopeful this determine the right course of action for them. i am hopeful this is the case, they have the party's long—term interests at heart. case, they have the party's long-term interests at heart. the next steps if henry bolton doesn't go of his own accord, is this
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extraordinary emergency meeting in february, could the party members back him or arbour lake in tune with the rest of the party say?” back him or arbour lake in tune with the rest of the party say? i cannot predetermine what that meeting will be. what is clear is ukip are absolutely crucial, over the next few months in delivering the brexit 17.4 million voters are looking for. it is crucial the party gets a leader because the grassroots organisation capable of taking the lead campaign to the streets of britain... why not let henry bolton get on with that because this continues the divisiveness in the public are seeing a row ukip? for the reasons i havejust said, the party membership need to be behind their leader in taking the campaign forward. it is better they have the ability to make that decision now, so we can ability to make that decision now, so we can focus ability to make that decision now, so we can focus on ability to make that decision now, so we can focus on important elections and the brexit campaign that will follow over the summer,
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than have this dragging on. the decision made yesterday by the national executive committee was to allow the membership to have their say, keep him as leader if they wish set about the process of putting in a replacement. battle which is more important than all of this over the summer. important than all of this over the summer. mr bolton says this is a personality clash? we are a political party that is full of big personalities. we have a robust constitution and process that allows membership democratically to decide who its leadership should be. the membership will now have their say. as chairman, i am confident you can will come together, campaign for the 17.4 million british voters who want to leave the european union, who should remain our priority. you talk about a policy full of big
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personalities, would you welcome nigel farage back as leader?” personalities, would you welcome nigel farage back as leader? i would welcome anything nigel farage wanted to do in ukip. i think nigel doesn't wa nt to to do in ukip. i think nigel doesn't want to be leader of ukip again, but he has made it clear he remained supportive of ukip. he has made it clear he will not go away and start another political party, we are grateful for that. it is a time to come together, including nigel, to represent the 17.4 million voters who are more important than anything else we are talking about today. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money. three of ukip's spokespeople, including its deputy leader resign in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. the negative impact of brexit is
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likely to be dwarfed by global growth, says a former treasury minister and remain. in sport, former england and blackpool defenderjimmy armfield has died following a long battle with cancer. a member of the 1966 world cup winning squad, he played more than 600 games for blackpool and captained england 15 times. he went on to manage bolton wanderers and leeds united and was a commentatorfor bbc and leeds united and was a commentator for bbc radio 5 live. he has been described as a national hero. roger federer is through to the australian open quarterfinals with a straight set wins. he defeated the hungarian in just over two straight set wins. he defeated the hungarian injust over two hours straight set wins. he defeated the hungarian in just over two hours and will face thomas babbage for the 26th time on wednesday. fresh from her fourth place finish 26th time on wednesday. fresh from herfourth place finish in germany at the weekend, lizzie lee arnold will lead teamgb's skeleton team next month. i will be back with more
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on those stories at 11:30am. princess eugenie has become engaged to her long—term boyfriend jack brooksbank. a statement from buckingham palace said the couple became engaged in nicaragua earlier this month. the wedding will take place in the autumn of this year at george's chapel in windsor. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchel is here. it will be busy for royal weddings in windsor, tell us more about this particular royal romance? we should remind ourselves who princess eugenie is. she is the second daughter of the duke of york so second daughter of the duke of york so is one of the queen's grandchildren. and as the daughter ofa grandchildren. and as the daughter of a son of the sovereign, she was entitled to royal rank, so she is her royal high and is. although she has the title and the style of being
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a royal, she is very much a minor member of the royal family. a royal, she is very much a minor member of the royalfamily. she has ajob, member of the royalfamily. she has a job, she works for an auction house for art. she doesn't carry out royal engagement so she doesn't have much of a public profile. however, she is the granddaughter of the queen and her family, she is the granddaughter of the queen and herfamily, the duke and duchess of york have announced her engagement this morning to jack brooks bank. they have known each other for seven years and they met in the fashionable swiss ski resort. he describes himself as the manager ofa he describes himself as the manager of a nightclub in mayfair. as you mentioned, the wedding will take place at st george's chapel at windsor in the autumn.” place at st george's chapel at windsor in the autumn. i guess she is part of this younger generation of royals who are that little bit removed from the duties of prince william, and lives a different
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lifestyle to them. she does have a job. it has become clear the centre of gravity of the future of the royalfamily will of gravity of the future of the royal family will reside very firmly with prince charles and with his two sons and their partners, william and catherine and harry, shortly of course, to marry meghan markle. the general feeling that the british royalfamily should general feeling that the british royal family should slim down and present a more economical face to the nation, the duke of york's two daughters have not, as it were, been encouraged to take on too much of a public role, which is part of the reason why princess eugenie has a job andi reason why princess eugenie has a job and i don't think that one would expect her significantly to increase either her public profile or her work as a member of the royal family. thank you very much, nicholas witchel. pessimistic predictions for the economy in the run—up
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to brexit may be off the mark because global economic growth is better than expected. that's according to a former treasury minister who backed the campaign to remain in the eu. in an interview with the bbc‘s economic editor kamal ahmed, lord 0'neill says britain should upgrade its economic forecasts for 2018 as china, the us and europe show increased activity. and he adds that the boost to exports from economic growth in our main trading partners is likely to dwarf any possible negative effects of brexit. lord 0'neill has been speaking ahead of this week's world economics forum in davos in switzerland, where a number of world economics are likely to see their forecasts upgraded. iam i am almost embarrassed to accept that it might sound like that, because of course, in principle, i share the views of many that brexit is like a really weird thing for the uk to impose on itself from an economic perspective. but i quickly
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add at the same time, i have felt for a good couple of years, as important as brexit is, it isn't the most important thing facing britain's future. things like regional inequalities and the underlying productivity problem. bigger issues. do you think with this productivity been better, the british economy will do better than you expected a year and a half ago? i certainly wouldn't have thought the uk economy would be as robust as it currently seems, but that is because it looks to me like some parts of the country, led by the northwest, are actually doing better than people seem to realise or appreciate. as well as this crucial fact, the rest of the world is doing much better than many people would have thought a year ago. it makes it easierfor the uk. have thought a year ago. it makes it easier for the uk. you have thought a year ago. it makes it easierfor the uk. you know, if this turns out to be borne out with more data in the coming months, the
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brexiteers will be like the cat with the cream. there you go, told you so. which of course, is ridiculous. our business presenter sally bundock is covering that world economic forum meeting in davos. sally, hello. before the main business gets underway, christine lagarde will be giving an overview of forecasts for various economies later on today. what is she going to say about the uk? as managing director of the international monetary fund, she will have a similar sentiment to what you heard there from lord 0'neill. the imf is expected, they have not released the data yet but they are expected to upgrade their outlook for the global economy, basically talking about the fa ct economy, basically talking about the fact that many regions in the global economy, china, america and europe are doing better than we anticipated. therefore, the uk will benefit from that this year. but
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there are expected to be, from the imf, some cautionary tones for the outlook for the uk because brexit means it is difficult to predict how this year and next year will go for the uk, in particular. also a political risk with what is seen to bea political risk with what is seen to be a weak government. those are some of the issues we are expecting the imfto of the issues we are expecting the imf to discuss this afternoon when they do the press conference where christine lagarde will be. christine lagarde has got a different role here this year. she is here in her role as managing director of the imf but she is the co—chair of this yea r‘s world but she is the co—chair of this year's world economic forum. we have several co—chairs this year they are picked because of their outstanding leadership and they all women this year. that is very important because here in davos they want to talk about female empowerment and the
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momentum of things gender inequality in terms of pay. it is a big story here. christine lagarde is pushing that message herself as opposed to the imf‘s global economic outlook. but just to say the imf‘s global economic outlook. butjust to say i will be talking to the chief economist of the imf later on this afternoon, once they have delivered their numbers for the global economy, the uk and europe. let me ask you in more detail about the lord 0'neill comments, he said this will dwarf any negative effects of brexit. but he is adamant those benefits could be even greater if the uk wasn't leaving the eu? absolutely. he did vote to remain and as treasury minister under george osborne, he was pro—europe and among those economists who were predicting very hard times ahead for
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the uk economy. i noticed in that interview he talked about the weirdness of brexit. that is the real problem when it comes to this issue of the uk exiting from the european union. it is difficult to predict how it will go and many believe that this year, and last year, 2017, 2018 would be pretty tough. he does highlight, i know this, lord 0'neill, in that interview, he highlights sectors who will experience serious headwinds. he talks about the car industry and the pharmaceuticals industry because he believes they are poorly explodes in relation to the trade if the uk comes out of the single market and the customs union. that is his perspective but we will get a lot more here from davos throughout the week. i will see you again sometime. sally, thank you very much. let's look at some of today's other developing stories:
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detectives are continuing to investigate the fatal stabbing of an eight—year—old girl in the west midlands. mylee billingham was named by police as the schoolgirl who died at an address near walsall on saturday night. a 54—year—old man, who was arrested in connection with the attack, remains in a critical condition in hospital. a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer because of issues with body image. ‘jo's cervical cancer trust', which surveyed more than 2000 women aged between 25 and 35, said it was worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. the key finding that has come out is that one in three women that have been researched say that body image is a very significant factor for not attending cervical screening. that's a big concern. for those under 35 it's the most common cancer, and if women aren't attending cervical screening then potentially their lives will be put at risk. hundreds of people have paid their respects
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to the cranberries singer, dolores 0'riordan, in her home city of limerick. she died suddenly in london last week, aged 46. large crowds gathered at stjoseph's church to view her open coffin ahead of herfuneral tomorrow. tokyo has held its first missile evacuation drill. volunteers took cover in subway stations and other underground spaces that would double as shelters in the event of a north korean missile strike. critics say it was a war game that fanned public fear. a man's been rescued after a week of being cut off by the snow. the 64—year—old, who lives in dumfries and galloway, had been attempting to reach the nearest village, but his path was blocked by deep snow. a mountain rescue team tried to drive to him, but had to abandon the car and go on foot to help him. they finally managed to reach the man after battling through drifts for two hours. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website. this is bbc news, coming up coal and
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malnutrition in the elderly, a report warns of a growing hunger problem in more than1 million pensioners. now, let's get the weather. a much milderfeel to things a much milder feel to things as we move through today and tomorrow. temperatures on the rise thanks to milderair temperatures on the rise thanks to milder air being dragged in from the south—west replacing the cold air we have had recently. today is an improving picture and they will be scattered showers across scotland with one or two into northern ireland and north—west england but dry, bright weather around and sunny spells developing. breezy in the north with a maximum of 11 celsius. this evening and overnight it will
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be chilly, temperatures dropping away where we have clearer skies. it will be wet and windy from the west as we move into the early hours. temperatures not too cold so most places getting away without a frost, perhaps intraoral places in the north—east we could see one or two prone spots. tomorrow, and my other day to come, fairly cloudy with outbreaks of rain, particularly in the north, working eastwards. blustery showers and a breezy day across the board with highs of 14 celsius. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: the head of the army warns that the military may struggle to respond to future threats without further investment. the leader of ukip, henry bolton, is facing growing pressure to stand down — after a third member of the party's front bench resigned over his refusal to quit. an ejector seat manufacturer has
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admitted breaching health and safety law over the death of the red arrows pilot in november 20 11. a former conservative treasury minister says economic growth in britain is likely to be better than predicted this year. and princess eugenie has got engaged to her boyfriend, jack brooksbank. the couple will marry in the autumn, at st george's chapel in windsor. let's get some sport. we begin with the sad news this morning that former england and blackpool defender jimmy armfield has died at the age of 82 following a long battle with cancer. the professional footballers association has described him as a national nero and football legend. i'm joined now by our sports correspondent david 0rnstein. extremely sad news, many describing him as the voice of football but what a player as well, how will he be remembered? terribly sad, if we
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go back his playing career, he joined blackpool and had a distinguished career, we rarely see a player is a one club man but that is what he was, playing for 17 yea rs, 627 is what he was, playing for 17 years, 627 appearances. nobody has played more for blackpool and that there is a stand and statue in his honour, he has the freedom of blackpool, he is mr blackpool. he played with many great players there including sir stanley matthews who likejimmy including sir stanley matthews who like jimmy armfield played for england. if we go on to his england career it was glittering as well, 43 caps, 15 as captain. he was part of the world cup winning squad in 1966. he did not play because of injury but he collected a medal 43 years later in 2009. he also managed at bolton, leading them to the old second division at the time and was the manager of leeds united after brian clough and led them to the
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european cup final in 1975. we are mourning the loss of a great man who also worked at the bbc for around 35 plus years as an expert summariser and the voice of football. so many tributes already coming in, the comments from the pfa calling him a hero, we expect so many more coming in? they have been flooding in already on traditional and social media. some, most pertinently, the family, after a long and courageous battle our beloved husband, father, grandfather and father—in—law battle our beloved husband, father, grandfather and father—in—lanimmy armfield has passed away peacefully surrounded by his immediate family. at this time they are still in shock as we begin the grieving process. we know he was a public figure but the family respectfully ask for privacy at this time. blackpool have sent their heartfelt condolences and will make further comments about how they plan to pay tribute to him. the football association has page viewed and gordon taylor said he will be
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sadly missed by all who knew him and the football world is much diminished by our loss. he had time for everybody and made the world a better place. rip jimmy, for everybody and made the world a better place. ripjimmy, it was a privilege and pleasure to know you, the dearest friends never to be forgotten. thank you, some very sad news, our thoughts with the family and friends at the moment. we bring in melbourne where roger federer has roared through to the quarter finals — becoming the oldest man to reach the last eight since ken rosewell in 1977. he beat hungary's marton fucsovics in straight sets — making quick work of him too in under two hours. this will be federer‘s 14th melbourne quarter final and his 52nd overall in grand slams. he'll face czech tomas berdych next — their 26th meeting. we have had some good ones over the yea rs we have had some good ones over the years going all the way back to the 0lympic years going all the way back to the olympic games in athens 2004. i am looking forward to playing against
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him, he seems in good shape and i'm happy he is over his back issues that he also had at the end of last year, that's a good thing. novak djokovic has just been knocked out, more reaction to that on the bbc website. and fresh from her 4th placed finish at the final skeleton world cup of the season in germany at the weekend lizzy yarnold will lead team gb's skeleton team at the pyeongchang winter games. yarnold is aiming to become the first british winter 0lympian to retain her title, with her success in sochi four years ago. she'll bejoined by laura deas, dom parsons and jerry rice to compete in south korea next month. i think there's a reason people don't try to defend winter titles, it's a lot of hard work but it's a tea m it's a lot of hard work but it's a team effort. i am the one on the track sliding down the track headfirst but there is a whole group of people who have helped keep me going over the past four years and will support me so i'm really
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excited to go out and i intend to retain my title. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you. more than a million elderly people in the uk are suffering from malnutrition. that's according to a parliamentary report, seen exclusively by bbc news. the report says money given to wealthy pensioners to help pay their heating bills should be used instead to help tackle hunger among the elderly. john maguire reports. do you always manage to finish what we deliver to you? yeah. janet is receiving a check up—this morning from annabel martin, a nutritionist from the hertfordshire independent living service. 0k, and that's a slightly more than you were last time so that's absolutely fantastic. she is malnourished but today there is good news, she's putting on weight. malnourishment is defined as when the body doesn't get the nutrients it needs to function properly. a parliamentary report published today says it affects 1.3 million elderly people, but it's an estimate. the data comes from 2011 so it's
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calling for updated information. those who provide meals on wheels suspect it's a much bigger problem. well, we're dealing with malnutrition on a daily basis. we've done our own research screening clients when they first come to our meals on wheels service and we discover that 44% of them are malnourished to some extent. it seems crazy to me that hunger amongst the elderly is something which is still prevalent in this country. and the best guess for the cost of the problem is almost £12 billion and rising. partly about ageing population, maybe partly through poverty, more so because of isolation but none of that is a reason for the government not thinking more imaginatively how it might spend a very small part of the pensioner budget in a way which really meets people in dire need. turn it up a bit.
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the report makes several recommendations. they include taking winter fuel payments from the wealthiest pensioners to help fund community support. more meals on wheels, not only to provide food but also tackle isolation and loneliness. and an increased role from supermarkets to offer slower shopping lanes and lunch clubs for the in—store cafe. hello, ruth. ruth hasjust turned 91... hi, ruth. and still cooks for herself in the evening but has a daily lunch delivery. lemon chicken today. oh, that looks nice. 0n rice. that looks lovely. she is well nourished and enjoys the social contact. i can't grumble because they never miss, they always come every mortal day regardless of the climate and the weather. the report recognises that government and local authority budgets are under pressure but social services directors say their work needs proper funding.
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the money talked about in the report, in my view, would be significantly insignificant when we talk about the amount of money that's required to truly put social care on a sustainable footing. national governments across the uk say they're taking steps to tackle malnutrition and in england, for example, the care act makes sure that vulnerable people's needs are met by the local authorities. but today's report is a challenge to us all to do something about it. you saw him in that report, let's hear more from labour mp frank field — the chair of the all—party parliamentary group on hunger. he's in our westminster studio. thank you very much for taking the time this morning, i am sure you will have come across in your
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research for this report the most heartbreaking stories? there are. i thought that was an excellent package including the person who was criticising us for not being more bawled on their money might be reallocated. but first steps are important. we are asking the government to collect up—to—date data which i think we'll shock us. we a cce pt data which i think we'll shock us. we accept this is not the normal story of increasing poverty amongst elderly people, although that remains a problem. it's not what it used to be. it is much more on the isolation of elderly people and it isolation of elderly people and it is how do we make up for the loss of partners, the loss of local shops and so on. it's calling for a different approach. we are not saying this report cracks the whole issue of social care, of course it doesn't, as one of the people in your interview suggested. but it is a very important move to make sure people have good food delivered to
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their homes. it widens it up, what their homes. it widens it up, what the government might also do but what for example supermarkets make do. let's talk about some of those things, would you want then new loneliness minister tracey crouch to look at this as part of her remit, because you say it's notjust about economics, it's about isolation and loneliness as well? she is a cracking minister so i cannot believe this report is not on her deskis believe this report is not on her desk is one of the first pieces of information she has so it's a cross— party information she has so it's a cross—party group which produced this report. we will want to see her and discuss what the government initiatives may be. very important about collecting up—to—date data so we can be sensible about what policy proposals we put forward. but we also want, as i say, making sure supermarkets respond in a positive way. what would you like to see them do? respond in the way the best ones do, to set up slow shopping lanes so
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pensioners don't feel they are being hassled by those people who can shop more quickly. using more imaginatively their cafes to at the same time as having slow lanes open offering lunch clubs for pensioners. and where local shops have closed, how can they think outside the box and give pensioners the opportunity of coming into the supermarket in the first place? as you hinted as well in the report and ijust washed to underscore, it's also a job for good neighbours. goodness knows what this problem would be like if it was not for a good neighbours already keeping an eye on vulnerable pensioners particularly those who have lost our partner and therefore might think it's not, there is no sense in clipping just for one of us now instead of two, making sure that when good neighbours cook a meal, maybe making sure their neighbour who might be vulnerable get one as
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well. in terms of the hard figures you would argue that this in the long run would save money, avoid people having to go to hospital and into social care? it will be a huge saving in the slightly longer term for the government because what we've seen today is a number of doctors stepping forward that as marlene —— pensioners suffering from malnutrition coming to accident and emergency, they have brakes, they are falling over because of malnutrition, gaining other infections and it takes hospitals that much longer to get people back toa that much longer to get people back to a reasonable level of health. this will have a beneficial knock—on effect to the nhs crisis if we take positive action on this front. thank you very much, frank field. the former england and blackpool playerjimmy armfield has
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died at the age of 82. armfield played over 600 times for the club and was part of the 1966 world cup winning squad. after he retired, armfield managed bolton wanders and leeds united, and was a commentator at bbc radio 5live for over 30 years. 0n the line is mark lawrenson, ex—liverpool defender and former radio 5live colleague ofjimmy armfield. thank you forjoining us today, he had a 360 degrees view of the game asa had a 360 degrees view of the game as a player, manager, commentator, what are your best memories of him? i think first and foremost and i am sure you will hear this for the rest of the day he was an absolutely beautiful human being. such a nice quy: beautiful human being. such a nice guy, he has worked for 5live which was originally a radio two and i can guarantee anybody who has worked with him would echo what i am
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saying. as a player, when he played in the 60s and the early 70s he was right back but he was a very attacking right back, he almost broke the mould insofar as himself, they used to be defenders, getting they used to be defenders, getting the ball forward but he was certainly very creative. 0ne club man which was of course blackpool. when i was a young boy growing up in preston and playing for preston north end blackpool were the antichrist but the number of time i have been to him he was fantastic. he always had time for absolutely everybody. he really was such a nice bloke. how unlucky was he not to have played in the 1966 world cup even though he eventually got the medal? i think it was between himself and george cohen, the full right back who was an outstanding
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footballer and i imagine it was a very close thing between the two. i think it was a long time before the members of the squad who did not play any of the games, before they got a medal but the dead. butjimmy in terms of management, i heard about the european cup final when he was manager of leeds united i think it was against bayern munich and they were robbed that last night, he should have been a european cup winning manager. he got promotion with bolton etc, he used to smoke a pipe which people thought was an unusual in those days but he was mr blackpool and loved by everybody. notjust in blackpool and loved by everybody. not just in blackpool blackpool and loved by everybody. notjust in blackpool but by everybody who came across him at any time. a lot of people can play the game but not talk the talk, what was he like as a commentator? tune very good, minimum amount of words. never too busy or fluffy. he told it as it
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was. he had that detached view of the game, he spoke about certain incidents but he would speak with notjust one side are one team in mind but with both teams in mind as well. all right, mark lawrenson, thank you very much for your thoughts on former england captain jimmy armfield who has died aged 82. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money — the head of the british army warns in a rare public intervention. an ejector seat manufacturer admits breaching health and safety laws over the death of a red arrows pilot. in the business news:
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never mind brexit, the uk economy is on the move, and will do better than anyone expected, says lord 0'neill, a former minister and a remain supporter. keir group has offered to take on more than 200 carillion workers as it takes over its contracts on smart motorway and high speed rail projects. it's also been reported that balfour beatty and galliford try will take on 80 carillion staff as they take over contracts on the aberdeen western peripheral route. len mcclusky, the general secretary of unite is heading to paris today, he will be talking to the boss of peugeot. he believes there is a future for the health report vauxhall plant. visual has just announced 650 job cuts but only if the owner gives it a new car to build. more gloomy news on house—call
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finances, household reporting a sharp deterioration in financial well—being. things worse and that the steepest rate since last september. inflation expectations reached a 47 month high and there was the strongest demand for unsecured debt since february 2017, it all seems a bit gloomy. it according to market research group, we all know the last year has been hard, high inflation, wages have been lagging behind bart, and obviously people feel miserable about that but how much of an indicator of the future is it? it's a fairly good indication, what we spend contributes to economic growth in this country. the pressure is the average household is under the moment are still very intense, this combination of inflation at around 396 combination of inflation at around 3% and wage growth lagging by almost 196 3% and wage growth lagging by almost 1% in some sectors, it means the
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money we make is not going as far so we are having to cut back or take on more debt. taking on more debt is like an elastic band, how far does it stretch before it breaks and consumers are entrenched, that is the concern. how long can we go on? inflation is forecast to remain fairly high, at moderate from where we are now over the coming year. that will continue to erode the value of the pound in our pocket. the big question is will wages pick 7 we the big question is will wages pick up? we expect wage growth to rise for many years but itjust doesn't seem to happen. people are changing jobs, able to negotiate good salary because there are a few candidates to ta ke because there are a few candidates to take up new positions. people in jobs are getting poor annual wage reviews and that's keeping wage growth low. we need that to change and the key to that will be businesses getting more confident in the outlook.
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>> weather—mac: how vulnerable is this sensitivity to interest rates do you think? not too significant. the majority of mortgages are on fixed rates, deals which have been fixed for a few yea rs. 0f which have been fixed for a few years. of course not everyone has a mortgage so when you look at the actual numbers it's fairly low and add to that we are expecting one, maybe two interest—rate hikes from this historical low. i don't think interest rates are the main concern, it's the wage growth and the possibility for the labour market to turn down if business uncertainty continues to intensify. thank you very much, shares in bookmakers have
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tumbled this morning. william hill is down more than 14% and ladbrokes coral has fallen more than 12%. the sell—off has been sparked by a report in the sunday times that maximum stakes on fixed—0dds betting terminals will be cut drastically, to just £2. the government has already said it intends to reduce the maximum stake from £100 to between £50 and £2. dixons carphone has narrowed its profit outlook for the full—year. it now expects full—year pre—tax profit of between £365m—£385 million compared to a previous forecast of £360m—£400 million. commenting on trading for the 10 weeks to 6january, outgoing chief executive sebjames, said that in the uk and ireland "our boxing day sales did not quite mirror the promise of our very strong black friday week, but we are very confident that we grew market share in pretty much every category". he said: "looking forward we continue to keep our antennae twitching for any material change in consumer behaviour." in a move that could revolutionise the way we buy groceries, amazon opens its first supermarket without checkouts — human or self—service — to shoppers on monday. amazon go, in seattle, has been tested by staff for the past year. it uses ceiling—mounted cameras and electronic sensors to identify each customer and track what items they select, with purchases are billed to customers' credit cards when they leave the store. that's the business news.
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thank you. there is no four resignations from ukip over henry bolton. mike hookem, mep for yorkshire and the humber has resigned as assistant deputy leader. ina resigned as assistant deputy leader. in a statement he said although i did not make it public at the time i resign my position on friday morning, verbally and in writing. i kept as private as i had no intention of pre—empting the decision of the vote of no—confidence in henry bolton at the
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weekend and to give henry bolton the opportunity to do the honourable thing and resign. mike hookem says i urge him to stand down as a matter of priority for the good of the party and the grassroots membership. mike hookem follows on from the ukip deputy leader margaret parker, john bickley the immigration spokesman and the trade and industry spokesman william dogma. gary 0ldman has cemented his status as favourite to wina mac cemented his status as favourite to win a mac and oscar this year. he won the award for best actor at the screen actors guild award overnight for his role as winston churchill in the darkest hour. he was overcome by emotion as he accepted his prize. winston churchill reminds us we make a living by what we get but we make a living by what we get but we make a life by what we give. and you have given, you have given enormously tonight and i am so deeply, deeply honoured and proud to receive this
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magnificent award. perhaps you will be clutching gold soon? positive move in the gender equality movement in hollywood, minnie mouse will receive a star on the hollywood walk of fame today. she has been in the entertainment industry for 90 years and many fans say her star is long overdue. mickey mouse was given his star four decades overdue. mickey mouse was given his starfour decades ago. overdue. mickey mouse was given his star four decades ago. the overdue. mickey mouse was given his starfour decades ago. the headlines are coming up, in a moment we see goodbye to viewers on bbc two but first he is the weather. much milder temperatures starting the week then we have seen recently, some blue skies to begin with today, this photograph sent in this morning in birmingham, still some snow on the ground in a few spots, this photograph from nottinghamshire but that will start to melt as we see a shift in temperatures. yesterday temperatures struggling to get above freezing but as we step forward to
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tuesday temperatures wildly in the double digits. that's thanks to this milderaircoming double digits. that's thanks to this milder air coming from the south west, slowly replacing the colder air we've had recently. we will see milder temperatures with that. what of dry and bright weather around, sunny spells and scattering showers for the north and west, one or two for the north and west, one or two for northern ireland as well. quite breezy for scotland as we move through this afternoon, temperatures in scotland around about six, seven celsius. the bell store the brightness the further east, try and break across northern ireland. temperatures in london a maximum 10 celsius, mildest temperatures in the south—west, highs around ten perhaps 11 celsius this afternoon. going through this evening and overnight, clear skies to begin with,
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temperatures falling away fairly quickly but it will start to turn wetter and wendy are from the west as we move into the early hours. frost free for the majority of us, temperatures not as cold as they have been of late, perhaps in the north—east we could see one or two patches of frost. the mild air as we get to tomorrow is across the country so we have a more mild day to come tomorrow but not without sunshine unfortunately, there will be cloud and patchy rain which will be cloud and patchy rain which will be particularly heavy in the far north. some brightness particularly the further east you are and it will brighten up for the north—west as we go through the day, blustery showers could see thunder in the north. breezy day for everybody. as we get to wednesday we see a cold front sinking east and it will be a wendy wind with the possibility of severe gales, temperatures at a maximum of 13 but it will start to turn a bit colder as we get to the end of the
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week. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money — a warning from the head of the british army in a rare public intervention. you quit — four of ukip's spokespeople resign in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. an ejector seat manufacturer admits breaching health and safety laws over the death of a red arrows pilot. the negative impact of brexit is likely to be "dwarfed" by global growth, says a former treasury minister and remainer. if this turns out to be borne out with more and more data in the coming months, the brexiteers will be like the cat with the cream, they'll be like there you go, i told you so, which of course is ridiculous. tributes are paid to the former england and blackpool defenderjimmy armfield, who's died at the age of 82. also this hour — another royal wedding in windsor.
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buckingham palace announces the engagement of princess eugenie to jack brooksbank — they'll get married this autumn. iam i am overjoyed. i am thrilled. jack is an absolutely outstanding young man. good afternoon and welcome to bbc newsroom live. in a rare public intervention, the head of the army will warn today that britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies unless it gets extra money. in a speech to the defence think tank, the royal united services institute, general sir nick carter will point to russia's growing battlefield capabilities,
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including the threat posed by its long—range missiles and cyber warfare skills. simon clemison reports. images showing what russia said was a strike on syria. but the rockets come not from the mediterranean sea, but the caspian sea, more than 900 miles away. the head of the army says russia is building an increasingly aggressive military, which the uk is struggling to match. russia has also been simulating attacks closer to home, conducting large—scale exercises. this, the heavily armed klinongrad bordering lithuania. general sir nick carter will warn britain must take notice of what is going on around us and keep up, or we could be massively constrained. he will say the threats are not thousands of miles away, but are now on our doorstep. he says cyber warfare can also disrupt the lives of normal people. one of the most important aspects is to deter any aggression.
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you can only do that with a forward army and forward presence. we need a significant size in terms of the army. any thought of reducing the army below the numbers we have at the moment, about 80,000, i think it would put security at risk. the head of the army is not saying this in so many words, but one way to avoid the possibility of britain falling behind in combat could be money from the chancellor here at number11. he certainly won't want to see any cuts. the speech will be made with the approval of the defence secretary, who has already said a 2% rise should be a base, not a ceiling. no word yet from the chancellor. simon cleminson, bbc news. earlier i spoke to labour's shadow
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defence secretary. we have seen escalating threats of many different types whether it is cyber, hybrid warfare or some of the military manoeuvres we have seen russia participating in. what worries me is already since they have been in government, the conservatives have caught the armed forces. they have reduced the army from over 100,000 down to 70 8000. it isa from over 100,000 down to 70 8000. it is a whole quarter of the army gone. when you have the head of the army voicing these concerns it is high time for the government to take them very seriously. do you think it is wise the general sir nick carter in what is a frank speech, to be so blunt about these potential vulnerabilities? he is using this presumably as a last resort. i am sure he has tried very hard to make
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the arguments inside, but it now clearly has to be a public debate. the public want to be kept secure, they know you cannot do security on they know you cannot do security on the cheap and as they value our health service and want a decent health care service, they also want to be kept safe. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, is making a one—day visit to london. he's likely to visit the new us embassy in the capital, where it's thought he might formally open the facility. earlier this month, president trump cancelled a trip to the uk, which was set to include opening the embassy. mr tillerson is currently on a week—long tour of european capitals. breaking news and we are hearing universities are set to have widespread disruption after a vote for industrial action in a row over pensions. the university and college
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union saying industrial action, including strikes about pensions will be disrupting universities across the country. more on that coming upforyou. across the country. more on that coming up for you. but let's return to the ukip story. ukip's deputy leader has resigned in protest over henry bolton's decision to continue as party leader. mep margot parker, who'll remain in the party, says mr bolton has left the party in "limbo" after refusing to go, despite receiving a vote of no confidence from ukip's national executive committee. william dartmouth and john bickely have also resigned from the parties front bench. mr bolton faces repeated calls to quit over offensive text messages sent by his former girlfriend. let's get up today with this from chris mason. now it has gone up one since we last spoke, it is becoming
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farcical? i am running out of figures on the first hand and the second one is going to be deployed this afternoon. they have unanimously suggested that henry bolton should leave as the ukip leader. i say unanimously, henry bolton was one person around the table yesterday afternoon to say no. there has been a trickle, first margot parker, deputy leader, saying she was walking the plank and encouraging henry bolton to follow her onto it. then john encouraging henry bolton to follow her onto it. thenjohn bickely, the integration and immigration spokesman saying something similar. william dartmouth, mep for the south—west of england, former trade and industry spokesperson. and now mike holcombe, an assistant deputy leader and spoke on fisheries for the party in recent years. all of them making the same point, that they feel the party's message and
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they feel the party's message and they see the message should be distinctive around campaigning around what they would be a clean, decisive and proper brexit rather than a watering down and the compromises that are likely to come from theresa may in the negotiation. they say that should be the focus rather than mr bolton's private life, which has been the entire focus around the ukip for over a week. chris mason, thank you very much. let's speak now tojohn bickley, ukip's former immigration spokesman. he's in our salford studio. thank you forjoining us. it is becoming ratherfarcical, at this rate, henry bolton will have no front bench team to lead, but maybe thatis front bench team to lead, but maybe that is the point? it is disappointing. can i say on behalf of the party, i am sorry for those millions of people who have voted for ukip in the past view years, for the 17.4 million who voted to leave europe and are thousands of members. we have been making a mess of things
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for some time and we have to get our act together. i am sorry this has happened. the power to change is in the hands of mr bolton. i would plead with him to resign, and sort out his personal life. whilst he remains in politics, it is going to be difficult. he needs to get away. he doesn't need kicking, but he has taken a beating these last few days, clearly self inflicted, i would think, but i would ask him to resign and sort himself out. we have just got another one, tim aker has just resigned as local government spokesman. so it looks as though things are going to get worse before they start to improve for the party? possibly. we are democratic party and it is the members that let the leader and it is only the members who have the power to get rid of the leader. these were rules introduced
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in 2012 nigel farage was leader and we have to follow a process. there isa we have to follow a process. there is a pattern, someone becoming leader, only staying as leader for a short time before members of the party turn on that person?” short time before members of the party turn on that person? i have just said i am sorry on behalf of the party for what has happened. we won the referendum, a high point in recent british political history, a coup for both nigel and ukip. but we haven't done the right things by voters and members since then. i am sorry for that, we need to get our act together. no party has a right to exist, no party has a right to any to exist, no party has a right to a ny votes. to exist, no party has a right to any votes. we will have two rebuild the party and prove to people that we have the right policies and we can gain their respects and hope they will vote for us. would you go so far as to say that at this point,
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ukip does not represent an effective party for people who have voted for it in the past? at the moment i would have to say we're not making a very good fist of it. it goes without saying, we are not doing what we need to do. i make no bones about that, i will not try and deflect people'scriticism of the party at this moment in time. i accept party at this moment in time. i a cce pt we party at this moment in time. i accept we have got to get our act together. we will do... when, when? sooner rather than later, to be brutally honest with you. it feels like groundhog day at the moment. we can all say, let's pack up and go home, or we could say there is a need for ukip. brexit will not be delivered in the way that 17.4 million people voted for it. we have to reason the appeaser who cannot bring herself to say she vote leave if there was another referendum. so we have remained led government selling out the british government and kowtowing to the eu. but if ukip
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doesn't get its act together soon, ukip will not be any part of what remaining time there is before brexit? i don't disagree with you andi brexit? i don't disagree with you and i say we have to get our act together and that is obvious. 0ur members, i believe, will pull together. we want to say to henry, you had a great cd, you had an 0be and we thought you were the guy to ta ke and we thought you were the guy to take us forward. but sadly your politicaljudgment was take us forward. but sadly your political judgment was lacking. rather than keep kicking you, it has been a torrid time for you and your family, please, go away and sort out your personal life and get the hell out of politics. it is not good for you or good for your family or anyone you want to form a relationship with in the future. john bickely, thank you for your time. a fifth ukip resignation, tim aker, mep has just time. a fifth ukip resignation, tim aker, mep hasjust quit time. a fifth ukip resignation, tim aker, mep has just quit as local government spokesman bringing to
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five, the number of resignations from the ukip bench in less than 24 hours. that was john from the ukip bench in less than 24 hours. that wasjohn bickely a moment ago, one of those who resigned. the manufacturer of raf ejection seats has pleaded guilty to health and safety offences following the death of red arrows pilot. flight lieutenant sean cunningham died in 2011 when he was ejected from hisjet while it was parked on the ground at raf scampton. martin baker, who made the ejection seat, admitted errors at lincoln crown court today. 0ur correspondent danny savage is at lincoln crown court for us. danny, remind us about the background and what happens in court? this was a tragic event for the raf red arrows, based just outside lincoln at raf scampton about four miles away. in the last few minutes they have been practising overhead, you can hear them flying around, they are in
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their preseason practice phase. but in 2011, sean cunningham was red five. there are nine planes in the red arrow and he was number five. they were getting ready to go on a training flight. unexpectedly, his ejector seat went. it fired him more than 200 feet into the air, but tragically, the main parachute that should have deployed from the ejection seat to save his life, didn't come out at all, so he plummeted back down, still strapped into his seat and died from serious chest and head injuries. an inquest took place a couple of years later into his death, in which the coroner criticised martin baker, the manufacturers of the injection seed. basically, there was a nut and bolt on the ejector seat which had been over titan. that prevented the parachute from deploying and martin baker, the company that made the
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seat, had known about this and advise some departments but not the raf. the health and safety executive brought charges against martin baker, who make all the ejector seats for the raf at the moment. the company pleaded guilty to charges from the health and safety executive at lincoln crown court. 0ne single charge was put to them and they pleaded guilty to that and they will be sentenced next month. it is likely to be a fine, nobody will go to prison for this but it will be a fine imposed on to the company. it brings an end, if you like, to this series of unanswered questions about the death of flight lieutenant sean cunningham, who was 35 years old. his family was in court to hear the
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guilty plea and we will know what penalty martin baker will face. any news to that reaction so far? no, martin baker released a statement saying they admitted to discharge and the family will not be speaking at the moment, because they will wait until the sentence has been passed. that is when all parties will be talking. it has been a significant step forward. up until this point, martin baker pleaded not guilty to the charges against them. they change that today. it is significant for the family, who have been going through this for more than six years, and for the raf and his colleagues and former colleagues, who will be following this closely. thank you very much, danny savage. the headlines. five ukip meps have
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stood down from ukip. britain is falling behind its enemies says the head of the army in a rare public intervention. and ejector seat manufacturer admits a breach of health and safety laws over the death of a red arrows pilot. let's get the sport now. we begin with the sad news that former england and blackpool defender jimmy armfield has died at the age of 82 following a long battle with cancer. the professional footballers association has described him as a national nero and football legend. i'm joined now by our sports correspondent david 0rnstein. if we go back to his playing career, hejoined if we go back to his playing career, he joined blackpool and had if we go back to his playing career, hejoined blackpool and had a distinguished career. we rarely say a player has been a one club man, but that is whatjimmy armfield was, playing for 17 years, 620
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appearances. nobody has played more for blackpool. there is a stand named after him, a statue named in his honour, the freedom blackpool. he is mr blackpool. he played with many great players, including the great sir stanley matthews, who, likejimmy great sir stanley matthews, who, like jimmy armfield, played for england. he had 43 caps. he was part of the england's world cup winning squad in 1966. he didn't play because of injury but he collected a medal 43 years later in 2009. he managed at bolton, leading them to the second division, the old second division at the time and then he was manager of legion knighted after brian clough and led them to the european cup final in 1975. he also worked at the bbc for over 35 years as an expert summariser and the voice of football. in melbourne,
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novak djokovic is out. the first korean to reach the quarterfinals of the grand slam. he will now play denis sang—moon. meanwhile roger federer hsa roared through to the quarter finals, becoming the oldest man to reach the last eight since ken rosewell in 1977. he beat hungary's marton fucsovics in straight sets, making quick work of him too in under two hours. this will be federer‘s14th melbourne quarter final and his 52nd overall in grand slams. we have had some good ones over the yea rs, we have had some good ones over the years, going back to the olympic games in athens in 2004. i am looking forward to playing against him. he seems in good shape and i am
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happy his back issues he had at the end of last year, thatis that is a good thing. that is all the sport for now, i will have more after the lunchtime news. pessimistic predictions for the economy in the run—up to brexit may be off the mark, because global economic growth is better than expected. that's according to a former treasury minister who backed the campaign to remain in the eu. in an interview with the bbc‘s economic editor kamal ahmed, lord 0'neill says britain should upgrade its economic forecasts for 2018 as china, the us and europe show increased activity. and he adds that the boost to exports from economic growth in our main trading partners is likely to dwarf any possible negative effects of brexit. lord 0'neill has been speaking ahead of this week's world economics forum in davos in switzerland. i am almost embarrassed to accept that it might sound like that, because of course, in principle, i share the views of many that brexit is like a really weird thing for the uk to impose on itself from an economic perspective.
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but i quickly add at the same time, i have felt for a good couple of years, as important as brexit is, it isn't the most important thing facing britain's future. things like regional inequalities and the underlying productivity problem. bigger issues. do you think with this global growth, productivity been better, the british economy will do better than you expected a year and a half ago? i certainly wouldn't have thought the uk economy would be as robust as it currently seems, but that is because it looks to me like some parts of the country, led by the north west, are actually doing better than people seem to realise or appreciate. as well as this crucial fact, the rest of the world is doing way better than many people would have thought a year ago. it makes it easierfor the uk.
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you know, if this turns out to be borne out with more data in the coming months, the brexiteers will be like the cat with the cream. "there you go, told you so." which of course, is ridiculous. princess eugenie has become engaged to her long—term boyfriend jack brooksbank. a statement from buckingham palace said the couple became engaged in nicaragua earlier this month. the wedding will take place this autumn at george's chapel in windsor. herfather, the her father, the duke herfather, the duke of york her father, the duke of york has given his reaction. iam i am absolutely overjoyed, i am thrilled. jack is an absolutely outstanding young man and eugenie and he have got to know each other over a number of years and i am really thrilled for them. i cannot speakfor the really thrilled for them. i cannot speak for the duchess, but we, and for beatrice, we are overjoyed at the news today that eugenie and jack have got engaged. looking forward to
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the wedding? yes, it is now about finding the time and the date and getting it all organised. i think probably in the autumn sometime will be the sort of time everybody is looking at. but we can't fix a date yet, we have got to look at everybody‘s diaries. it is a bit more complicated than that. but it is their day, i am just completely overjoyed for them and wish them every happiness. short time ago i spoke to our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. we should remind ourselves who princess eugenie is. she is the second daughter of the duke of york, so she is one of the queen's grandchildren. and as the daughter of the son of the sovereign, she was entitled to royal rank, so she is her royal
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highness, princess eugenie. although she has the title and the style of being a royal, she is very much and minor member of the royal family. she has a job and works for an art auction house. she doesn't carry out royal engagements, so to that extent she doesn't have much of a public profile. the fact is, she is a granddaughter of the queen and her family, the duke and duchess of york announced her engagement this morning to jack brooksbank. they have known each other for seven yea rs, have known each other for seven years, they met in a fashionable swiss ski resort in 2010 and he describes himself as the manager of a nightclub in mayfair. as you mentioned, the wedding will take place at st george's chapel at windsor in the autumn. and i guess she is part of this younger generation of royals who are that little bit removed from the duties of prince william, prince harry and
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lives perhaps quite a different lifestyle to them? as i say, she has a job. it has become clear the centre of gravity of the future royal family centre of gravity of the future royalfamily will centre of gravity of the future royal family will reside very firmly with prince charles and with his two sons and their partners, with william and catherine and harry and shortly of course, to marry meghan markle. as a consequence of that, andi markle. as a consequence of that, and i think the general feeling the british royal family should slim down and present a more economical face to the nation, the duke of york's two daughters have not been encouraged to take on too much of a public role, which is part of the reason princess eugenie has a job andi reason princess eugenie has a job and i don't think one would expect her significantly to increase either her significantly to increase either her public profile, or her work as a member of the royal family. let's look at some of today's other developing stories:
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detectives are continuing to investigate the fatal stabbing of an eight—year—old girl in the west midlands. mylee billingham was named by police as the schoolgirl who died at an address near walsall on saturday night. a 54—year—old man, who was arrested in connection with the attack, remains in a critical condition in hospital. a charity says one in three young women in the uk are embarrassed to attend smear tests for cervical cancer because of issues with body image. ‘jo's cervical cancer trust', which surveyed more than 2000 women aged between 25 and 35, said it was worried about the impact on screening rates, which have fallen to a 20—year low. the key finding that has come out is that one in three women that have been researched say that body image is a very significant factor for not attending cervical screening. that's a big concern. for those under 35 it's the most common cancer, and if women aren't attending cervical screening then potentially their lives will be put at risk. a man's been rescued
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after a week of being cut off by the snow. the 64—year—old, who lives in dumfries and galloway, had been attempting to reach the nearest village, but his path was blocked by deep snow. a mountain rescue team tried to drive to him, but had to abandon the car and go on foot to help him. they finally managed to reach the man after battling through drifts for two hours. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website. much of the us federal government remains shut down after the senate postponed a vote on a budget measure to reopen it for business. republicans and democrats failed to break their stalemate during a rare sunday session. the republicans have suggested a shorter term funding package, with a promise to look afterwards at immigration issues considered essential by the democrats, an offer senior democrats have rejected. david willis reports from washington. members of congress met throughout
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the weekend, desperate to find a solution to a crisis that has shut down the government of the largest economy in the world. at the other end of pennsylvania avenue, the president was in residence after shelving plans to attend a fund—raising dinner at his florida retreat. the issue, the fate of these people, the so—called dream is brought to the united states illegally, whom president trump is threatening to deport in a few weeks. democrats want to link their fate to a funding bill that would end the shutdown. the republicans wanted it debated separately. any senators in the chamber... despite having the majority in both houses of congress, they need the opposition support to get a funding bill through senate. after several days of rancour, the republican leader promised to bring the
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dreamers issue of the debate in the next couple of weeks in return for ending the shutdown. the shutdown should stop today. we will soon have a vote that will allow us to do exactly that. so, let's step back from the brink, let's stop victimising the american people and get back to work. but democrats are adamant they want an early agreement to protect the dreamers from deportation. talks will continue but we have yet to reach an agreement on the path forward that will be a cce pta ble the path forward that will be acceptable for both sides. the white house released pictures from president trump on capitol hill but the president has been criticised by democrats for what they call his shifting positions on immigration. it was said on saturday it was like negotiating withjell—o. the last government shutdown in 2013 lasted
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16 days and caused the closure of many national parks and monuments. it led to around 800,000 workers being placed on temporary leave. the effects of the shutdown will start to be felt today as the working week gets under way here. the senate will reconvene later in the hope of resolving this game of political brinkmanship. the vote is set for noon. david willetts, bbc news, washington. many of us having a much better day, spells of sunshine around but a few showers mainly across scotland and northern england. those will fade to the afternoon, more cloud across wales and south west england and the few bright sunny spells but for many it will feel noticeably more mild than the weekend, temperatures 8—11. fairly quiet evening ahead, clear
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skies across parts of scotland and eastern parts of scotland and north eastern parts of scotland and north east england, icy stretches, elsewhere are dry and we would go west of the next spell of wet and windy weather arriving. strengthening winds as well but much more mild, lows between 3—9dc but the more unsettled day tomorrow, outbreaks of rain through the morning, some of it heavy. strong winds touching gale force, it will clear its weak east and see spells of sunshine so not raining all the time but we will notice how much milder it will feel, highs between 13 tomorrow. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines: the leader of ukip, henry bolton, is facing growing pressure to stand down — after five members of the party's front bench resigned over his refusal to quit. those within the party say they've made a number of mistakes recently. we really have been making a mess of
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things for some time now and we have to get our act together. the head of the army warns that the military may struggle to respond to future threats without further investment. an ejector seat manufacturer has admitted breaching health and safety law over the death of a red arrows pilot in november 2011. a former conservative treasury minister says economic growth in britain is likely to be better than predicted this year. and princess eugenie has got engaged to her boyfriend, jack brooksbank. the couple will marry in the autumn, at st george's chapel in windsor. the tally is mounting, another member of the ukip front bench has resigned. david curtin stepping down
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as education and apprenticeships spokesman. that coming from our political correspondent chris mason loses even he is losing count! david curtin resigning from ukip, in protest at the decision of the leader henry bolton not to step down from the leadership, more on that coming up. let's get more on one of our other head stories. the warning from the head of the army that britain's army risks being weaker than its enemies without more investment. general sir nick carter will talk about russia's military and cyber warfare skills. and now let's speak to mark almond, director of the crisis research institute at oxford university it's pretty unusual, if we take this speech as it's being billed as a very frank and open speech, it's unusualfor a senior
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very frank and open speech, it's unusual for a senior military figure to be so open like this about the risks posed to the military capability of the uk isn't it? yes particularly the army feel they have been underinvested for quite a long time. the navy with trident is getting the bulk of the expensive new equipment and we saw in afghanistan and iraq that a lot of routine military operations have become more dangerous because the army does not have the latest equipment. do you think there is any chance the being made by gavin williams and the defence secretary who we are told by this speech and is having stand—up rows with philip hammond, do you think more money will be coming forward? he might make the argument but i wonder if it is political viable because people in other services like hospitals will see they need more money, the government has demands from a
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variety of fronts. you have an interservice rivalry between the army and navy over what is the best use of the mod resources at the moment and then you have the problem if you boost defence spending is it politically possible to do that without there being broader increases in spending which would then raise problems for philip hammond as chancellor. is it a choice of conventional warfare and tackling cyber capabilities of russia? one of the problems of course is that the cyber issue is one for the security services, gchq for instance, how far do russia and other services have the ability to penetrate vital infrastructure of the country? we apparently had a north korean hackers paralysing parts of the nhs for a few days. if somebody on a grander scale tried to do that it is something in a sense which is the response body of gchq
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and m16. but if that was the pirelli toa and m16. but if that was the pirelli to a conventional war you have to ask if the army has the number of troops and equipment it would need? we are members of nato and it's highly unlikely there would be a war with russia. what we're thinking about is worst—case scenario. the problem for the military is that if it does not prepare for the worst case it might feel more likely to happen than if it has prepared but it needs resources. thank you very much. we can speak now to the first sea lord and former chief of the naval staff, lord west. he is in our westminster studio. good afternoon to you as well. you think it's a shock in itself that general sir mick carter will be speaking out as we have been told he will be later on today? i am amazed and delighted. it's unusualfor a serving chief to talk about threats
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when they have got really serious but i've not known of anyone speaking for more resources in my 52 yea rs. speaking for more resources in my 52 years. is it a sign of the political conflict between the defence secretary and the treasury? conflict between the defence secretary and the treasury7m conflict between the defence secretary and the treasury? it shows the secretary of state for defence on getting to post what did what was going on and thought goodness me this is bad, we need more money. he has tried to talk to the chancellor about it and had nojoy and i think he is saying we have to up our game and point out to the nation what arrested is running and if nothing else that flags it up to the prime minister who at the end of the day is the first secretary of the treasury and can put pressure on the chancellor. it will talk about also cyber warfare which is becoming more commonplace, but how much money is needed to tackle these threats? the
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amount of money the mod needs not to ta ke amount of money the mod needs not to take the catastrophic cuts which we re take the catastrophic cuts which were being looked at is probably in the region of about 2 billion per year or something like that. a lot of the money spent on cyber is spent on gchq and i'm not saying for a moment that cyber is not important, we need to look at the way we fight, how we tie cyber into unconventional warfare and conventional warfare. but we cannot just take cuts warfare and conventional warfare. but we cannotjust take cuts to our conventional capability of the scale which has been talked about. do you think those cuts the conventional forces are suffering because of money being put towards tackling cyber warfare? not at the moment because they might being put into it is tiny, really. it is happening because the 2% is not really 2% because the 2% is not really 2% because defence inflation is greater than normal inflation because the dollar exchange rate is very poor for us post brexit. and a lot of the
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money which was promised for defence was coming from so—called efficiency savings and the a savings. you can only get efficient to a certain extent and three years they have been finding efficiency savings. those actually are cuts. since 2010 the military has been cut effectively, it has lost one third of its capability since 2010. if the measures which are being looked at at the moment are taken it will mean that since 2010 the military has got half the capability it had. can you imagine if somebody was saying there are only going to be half the number of nhs hospitals? 0r half the amount of nhs hospitals? 0r half the amount of money spent on welfare? there would be outcry. but for some reason although the nation is put in peril thatis although the nation is put in peril that is not seem to be that feeling when it comes to defence and i think gavin is trying to make sure people realise what this means. a final thought, looking at this from the uk
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position within nato, are you if i can put it this way, slightly more reassured in terms of nato's capabilities in terms of any threat? the problem with nato is that europe does not spend enough on defence. since the second world war the united states and the united kingdom have ensured the defence and security of the continent which is for us. we spend 25% of what all the european countries spend on defence. because of these cuts that's been whittled away and that's a real risk for nato, it's a real risk for continental europe. people like emmanuel macron now they need our defence keep ability and i am very worried that these cuts we are making mean if there was a war by mistake or in error we are very poorly placed and also vladimir putin pushes at the margins and if he sees we are not willing to have ha rd he sees we are not willing to have hard power he will utilise the fact
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we haven't and i think that's very dangerous. very good to get your thoughts. thank you lord west. there's a call for nhs england to explain a change to the way hospital accident and emergency units record their performance. the uk statistics authority says it fears the public could reach "misleading conclusions" about how a&e units are coping. a spokesman for nhs improvement says the change was "not intended to artificially inflate a&e performance figures". faye kirkland is a freelance health reporter who also works as a gp. break down the detail of this for us, what is being suggested? the uk statistics authority wrote today to asked to explain why there have been these changes and that comes after a bbc investigation which has seen two e—mails sent to trusts by nhs improvement last year suggesting the
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way they could calculate their figures could change. 0ne way they could calculate their figures could change. one part of a&e figures we think about are the traditional departments where people go with a major injury but they also add in things like what the data to provide an overall figure. this e—mail suggested for the first time that time that trusts that don't run the walk—in centre could add them in that they did not run or were not located on the trust ‘s grounds to their overall trust performance. which is against guidelines? kill might guess, it is conflicting guidance. the invocation being that this added data could boost or improve the overall performance of these trusts? absolutely, people going to war in centres generally tend to be well, they are busily going because they are unwell but they get seen within four hours so by including them into the overall trust performance it will increase
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the trust performance. we have seen at least six trusts where they have had in centres that they don't run. and that has seen an increase in a performance as a result. tells about the statement from images improvement and what investigation is being done? nhs improvement has said the data has not been included to increase performance but to allow consistency as some trusts who do run walk—in centres could have added their men. the department of health has said it should be as nhs england has said it should be as nhs england has said it should be as nhs england has said and not what nhs improvement has said which adds to the confusion. thank you for taking us the confusion. thank you for taking us through that. pessimistic predictions for the economy in the run—up to brexit may be off the mark — because global economic growth is better than expected. that's according to a former treasury minister who backed the campaign to remain in the eu. in an interview with the bbc‘s economic editor kamal ahmed, lord 0'neill says britain should upgrade its economic forecasts for 2018 as china, the us and europe show increased activity. lord 0'neill has been speaking ahead of this week's world economics forum
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in davos in switzerland. joining me now is ben gardiner, director of cambridge econometrics — the organisation which recently released the first comprehensive brexit economic impact assessment. thank you forjoining us today. what is your assessment of what lord o'neil is your assessment of what lord 0'neil has had to say? is your assessment of what lord o'neil has had to say? obviously he is commenting on the fact that growth is expected for 2018 to be higher. this is likely to boost uk export performance and therefore boosted gdp growth but we see this asa boosted gdp growth but we see this as a short—term thing and it's an expectation of what might happen. it does not detract from the fact that our study was a long—term study about the long—term effect of brexit. we stand by those studies. so you're not comparing
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like—for—like although to be fair to lord 0'neil he does say that he thinks without brexit the economic benefits would be even greater. tell us more benefits would be even greater. tell us more about what you find in your study on the longer term impact? what we look that was three main effects, one was on trade prices which comes about through increased tariffs, the second on the effect of investment principally through foreign direct investment and how that might be affected by trade barriers and the uk being a less attractive place to invest and thirdly on the effect of migration and how this might lead to into skills and productivity. all those factors a re skills and productivity. all those factors are things which underpin the uk's long—term competitiveness i don't think one years expectation of higher growth will change that. so you are arguing in your report the government should be avoiding what you would call the worst outcome of an ordeal scenario? absolutely. all
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the other studies which have been done so far come to the same conclusion more or less. give us your thoughts if you would only economic forecast for 2018 and the behaviour of china, the us and other european markets and how that might impact on the economy here in the uk? as i have said the gdp growth in this countries will feed through into higher export growth for the uk. there will be increased demand for uk exports. there will likely be an increase in imports as well because there are significant supply chain effects. firms trade with each other across europe and across the globe. it's not just other across europe and across the globe. it's notjust one—way traffic in the sense that higher gdp growth will benefit the uk in one direction. there will be other effects as well. so you don't think that growth would be enough to negate any negative impact of
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brexit? it will offset some of the effects we are already seeing in the sense of investment uncertainty, delaying investments by firms and perhaps some of the effects of labour supply shortages although it may exacerbate these if there is increased demand and activity unless people around to meet the demand. all right, thank you, very interesting. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: six key figures in ukip resign in protest over henry bolton's decision not to step down as party leader. britain's military risks falling behind that of its enemies without extra money — a warning from the head of the british army in a rare public intervention. an ejector seat manufacturer admits breaching health and safety laws over the death of a red arrows pilot. turkish forces are continuing their assault on the american—backed
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kurdish militia group in syria, the ypg. the offensive risks putting turkey into direct confrontation with the us and other nato allies involved in the fight against so—called islamic state. reports in turkey say their forces have advanced about five kilometres into the afrin region of north—west syria. the turkish government is facing international calls for restraint — there will be an an emergency debate at the un security council later today. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is on the turkish border with syria. ican i can show you the border behind me. what we have just seen this morning is the coffin of a syrian refugee killed yesterday has just been driven across the border into syria where he will be buried with his family. we spoke to his son and he
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told us the circumstances, his elderly father driving in the centre yesterday when the rocket hit and showed us pretty graphic footage of the attack. it just showed us pretty graphic footage of the attack. itjust shows you the kind of vulnerability turkey is facing in this operation. i ground and air offensive targeting the militia in syria, the ypg who have immense firepower and they have been trained and armed by america. in the fight against the islamic state they have shown how effective they can be so turkey will be facing quite a big challenge to try to overpower them. more than a million elderly people in the uk are suffering from malnutrition. that's according to a parliamentary report, seen exclusively by bbc news. the report says money given to wealthy pensioners to help pay their heating bills should be used instead to help tackle hunger among the elderly. john maguire reports. do you always manage to finish what we deliver to you? yeah. janet is receiving a check up—this morning from annabel martin,
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a nutritionist from the hertfordshire independent living service. 0k, and that's a slightly more than you were last time so that's absolutely fantastic. she is malnourished but today there is good news, she's putting on weight. malnourishment is defined as when the body doesn't get the nutrients it needs to function properly. a parliamentary report published today says it affects 1.3 million elderly people, but it's an estimate. the data comes from 2011 so it's calling for updated information. those who provide meals on wheels suspect it's a much bigger problem. well, we're dealing with malnutrition on a daily basis. we've done our own research screening clients when they first come to our meals on wheels service and we discover that 44% of them are malnourished to some extent. it seems crazy to me that hunger amongst the elderly is something which is still prevalent in this country. and the best guess for the cost
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of the problem is almost £12 billion and rising. partly about ageing population, maybe partly through poverty, more so because of isolation but none of that is a reason for the government not thinking more imaginatively how it might spend a very small part of the pensioner budget in a way which really meets people in dire need. turn it up a bit. the report makes several recommendations. they include taking winter fuel payments from the wealthiest pensioners to help fund community support. more meals on wheels, not only to provide food but also tackle isolation and loneliness. and an increased role from supermarkets to offer slower shopping lanes and lunch clubs for the in—store cafe. hello, ruth.
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ruth hasjust turned 91... hi, ruth. and still cooks for herself in the evening but has a daily lunch delivery. lemon chicken today. oh, that looks nice. 0n rice. that looks lovely. she is well nourished and enjoys the social contact. i can't grumble because they never miss, they always come every mortal day regardless of the climate and the weather. the report recognises that government and local authority budgets are under pressure but social services directors say their work needs proper funding. the money talked about in the report, in my view, would be significantly insignificant when we talk about the amount of money that's required to truly put social care on a sustainable footing. national governments across the uk say they're taking steps to tackle malnutrition and in england, for example, the care act makes sure that vulnerable people's needs are met by the local authorities. but today's report is a challenge to us all to do something about it.
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gary 0ldman has cemented his status as favourite to win an oscar this year after being awarded ‘best actor‘ at the screen actors guild awards. the annual awards in los angeles, are voted on purely by actors and gave the chance for some of entertainment‘s biggest stars to once again voice their concerns over sexual misconduct allegations and the issue of equality. peter bowes reports. an awards season like no other. rarely has a single issue dominated talk on the red carpet like the sexual harassment scandal and the ‘me too' and ‘time's up' movements. but this is hollywood's response to months of revelations about some of its most prominent figures. for these women to have these stories now out and being told is so important. to keep reiterating we believe you, we are listening to you, and we are doing what we can to change it. for the first time in its history,
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all the presenters of the screen actors guild awards were women. rosanna arquette and marisa tomei paid tribute to those who have spoken up about abuse. and we're inspired that so many powerful voices are no longer silenced by the fear of retaliation. applause. we can control our own destiny. and, rosanna, you are one of those voices, you're one of the silence breakers, and we all owe you a debt of gratitude. applause. the awards themselves are a good indicator of which films are likely to do well at the oscars. gary 0ldman, who plays winston churchill in darkest hour, was overcome with emotion as he accepted the prize for 0utstanding actor in a leading role. churchill reminds us we make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.
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and you have given, you have given enormously tonight. the awards were dominated by three billboards 0utside ebbing, missouri, the film about a mother's quest to find the killer of her teenage daughter. three billboards 0utside ebbing, missouri is now a hot favourite to do well at the oscars in a few weeks. the nominations are out tomorrow. now here's some positive news in the gender equality movement in hollywood. minnie mouse is finally due to receive a star on the hollywood walk of fame today. she's been in the entertainment industry for 90 years and many disney fans say her star is long overdue. her beloved mickey was honoured with a star four decades ago. priests are taking part in the annual popejohn paul ii
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skiing competition in poland. the oldest participant is 76 and has been taking part in the event for several years. 0rganisers say they wanted priests to not only give an example of how to pray, but also how to compete honestly. in a moment the news at one with reeta chakrabarti. first the weather with alina jenkins. the trend to something milder is underway, we still have a lot of snow in northern ireland, scotland and north west england but that will start to fall and interesting temperature contrasts, some places struggling to get above freezing yesterday was the milder air was arriving to south—west england, by tomorrow most of us will be in double figures, some parts of wales and west in england could see temperatures up to 14—15 because we've lost the feed of cold air, winds changing direction and pushing milderair winds changing direction and pushing
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milder air across the country. quiet evening but still icy stretches for the far north of scotland and north eastern parts of england, dry for many at first but the next spell of wet and windy weather arriving, it will be a more mild night, laws between 3—9dc but the more unsettled day tomorrow. strengthening winds, rain on and off through the day. at 8am, rush—hour, billy wet start, heavy and persistent rain coupled with a strengthening wind. the rain clearing from northern ireland through the morning, more likely to come through the afternoon, nest and low cloud, poor visibility. come through the afternoon, nest and low cloud, poorvisibility. looks like the rain will be draped across north—east part of england, bounded east anglia, across the m4 corridor, cloud and mist and fog and strong winds. at some stage tomorrow we will all see rain on and off but not raining all the time, as it clears
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the should be good spells of sunshine but also more showery rain pushing east, quite a windy day but are much more mild. some parts of wales, western parts of england could see highs of 14 or 15. very u nsettled could see highs of 14 or 15. very unsettled as we go from tuesday night into wednesday, the squeeze on isobars will bring gales is not severe gales and another spell of rain which will continue to sink south—east through wednesday quite an unsettled day midweek and behind it temperatures starting to drop saw 12 or 13 it temperatures starting to drop saw 12 or13 in it temperatures starting to drop saw 12 or 13 in the south compare 27 or eight further north. still windy for the end of the week but the through friday, sunshine and showers and feeling a bit colder. six of ukip's senior members have now resigned in protest against the party leader henry bolton. they've left because he won't step down after a vote against him and a string of stories about his private life. we'll bring you all the latest from westminster. if he hangs around politics, given
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what has happened and the nature of his inner sanctum, what has happened and the nature of his innersanctum, i what has happened and the nature of his inner sanctum, i don't think it will be good for him or anyone he is with. also this lunchtime: a government watchdog questions the accuracy of some of england's a&e waiting time figures. the head of the army is to warn that britain's armed forces risk falling behind russia if they aren't given more money. the red arrows pilot who died after being accidentally ejected from his plane, the seat manufacturer admits responsibility. and monday morning, but no return to work for hundreds of thousands of americans as the federal shutdown continues.
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